The New Versace Home Collection Is the Fantasy of Our Candy-Colored, Neon-Tinged Dreams

ELLE Decor celebrates designer Sasha Bikoff and artist Andy Dixon’s collaboration with the fashion house during Milan Design Week.

Versace-Home-Collection
Versace

One day into Milan Design Week, and we’re calling it: The top installation has already been decided, and it’s at the Palazzo Versace on Via Gesù, where white-hot interior design talent Sasha Bikoff and artist Andy Dixon have dressed up each room in a wild remix of prints, hues, and paintings best described as a neon-tinged fever dream. And we are here for it.

Last night, ELLE Decor editor in chief Whitney Robinson, Bikoff, Dixon, and Versace Home hosted an exclusive dinner and sneak peek to celebrate the special installation, which marks the first time that the fashion house has ever undertaken a complete redecoration of the palazzo for Milan Design Week.

Versace-Home-Collection
Versace

Friends and guests, including designers Matteo Cibic, Ini Archibong, Nada Debs, Laura Sartori Rimini and Roberto Peregalli of Studio Peregalli, Julian Bedel, Valerio D’Ambrosio, Alan Richard, and more, arrived to a feast for the eyes as they dined beneath neon candy-colored archways made to complement the 18th-century architecture. Upstairs, Versace Home debuted a host of six new seating collections that play on its iconic brand imagery and asked Bikoff to design each room with them. The result is a gloriously outrageous mashup of styles that some are calling “Versasha.”

Elle-Decor-Versace-Dinner
Whitney Robinson

In Donatella’s legendary fitting room—where countless models have perfected their catwalk—Bikoff has installed a feathery wallpaper on the ceiling to complement the Rhapsody seating collection, which features patterned upholstery with jewelry-like hardware accents. Elsewhere, a shocking-pink Astroturf lines the floor of a room debuting Jungle, a line of indoor-outdoor seating covered in an allover pink-and-green palm print. A longtime fan, Bikoff cited Versace’s fall/winter 1994 campaign photographed by Richard Avedon as her main inspiration for the project.

For his part, Dixon was commissioned to produce several new works to decorate the space. He was already developing his signature Versace Shirt series of oversize canvas paintings, which take the form of giant, nine-foot-tall shirts, when the brand approached him. Along with several of his framed paintings, Dixon’s huge shirt paintings hang, monumentally, throughout the home: in the dining room and the stairwell, as well as on the walls, where they’ve been patterned and printed into a punchy wallpaper collaboration.

Versace-Home-Collection
Versace

In the courtyard, Bikoff has mounted an installation filled with palm trees, glowing neon stage displays, and unique customizations of archival Versace Home classics, specially upholstered in metallic tones and shocking hues. J. Lo’s famous green Grammy dress, too, has been reimagined in pink with feather trim and displayed on a Versace Home chaise made to match. “I like to match my outfits to my interiors,” says Bikoff, who for the occasion wore a neon-yellow minidress—designed by Versace, of course—in step with Robinson, the evening’s cohost, who donned a neon-lime Versace suit.

Underfoot, Bikoff also created a custom carpet featuring a swirling mix of iconic Versace motifs—from the Medusa logo to graphic checkerboards to cheetah prints—for a maximalist statement that does justice to the Rococo-meets–Memphis Group staircase at the Kips Bay Decorator Show House that put her star on the rise. For Bikoff, it’s all a dream project and an emphatic love letter, really, to the brand she has idolized and collected since her preteen years.

Versace-Home-Collection
Versace

“I have a long history with Versace,” she says. “My first designer dress that I ever wore was Versace. When I got the call saying Donatella loved my work and wanted me to design interiors, I thought, The stars have aligned.”

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